select the expected major organic product for the reaction shown.

In organic chemistry, there are a variety of reactions that can take place. When predicting the products of a reaction, it is important to take into account the type of reaction that is taking place. In this blog post, we will discuss how to select the expected major organic product for the reaction shown.

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Introduction

In organic chemistry, reactions are classified as addition reactions, elimination reactions, substitution reactions, or pericyclic reactions. Reaction types can be further subdivided into various specific reaction types, such as nucleophilic substitutions or electrophilic substitutions. The expected major organic product for a given reaction can be predicted by understanding which reaction type is taking place and what the specific conditions are.

Addition reactions involve the additiom of one or more atoms or groups of atoms to a molecule. In general, addition reactions occur at alkene carbon-carbon double bonds or alkyne carbon-carbon triple bonds. The expected major organic product for an addition reaction is usually a compound that has one more atom or group of atoms than the starting material. For example, the addition of hydrogen to an alkene produces an alkane, and the addition of chlorine to an alkene produces a dichloroalkane.

Elimination reactions involve the removal of one or more atoms or groups of atoms from a molecule. In general, elimination reactions occur at substituted alkenes (such as halogenated alkenes) or substituted aromatics (such as nitroarenes). The expected major organic product for an elimination reaction is usually a compound that has one less atom or group of atoms than the starting material. For example, the elimination of chlorine from a chloroalkane produces an alkene, and the elimination of bromine from a bromoarene produces an arene.

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Substitution reactions involve the replacement of one atom or group of atoms in a molecule with another atom or group of atoms. In general, substitution reactions occur at substituted alkyl halides (such as chloroalkanes) or aromatic compounds (such as benzene). The expected major organic product for a substitution reaction is usually a compound that has the same number of atoms and groups of atoms as the starting material. For example, the substitution of hydroxide for chloride in a chloroalkane produces an alcohol, and the substitution of cyanide for hydrogen in benzene produces cyanobenzene.

Theoretical Background

In order to select the expected major organic product for the reaction shown, one must first understand the concept of organic reactions and how they work. In short, organic reactions are those that involve the substructure of a molecule in order to create a new molecule. The specific molecules that are involved in the reaction are known as reactants, and the new molecules that are created are known as products. In order for a reaction to take place, there must be a change in the bonds between atoms in the reactant molecules. This change can be either a breaking of old bonds or the creation of new bonds.

One way to predict the outcome of an organic reaction is to look at the types of reactant molecules that are involved. For example, if two reactant molecules have the same type of bond (e.g. two carbonyl groups), it is likely that they will undergo a nucleophilic substitution reaction. This is because molecules with similar bonds tend to interact with each other in a predictable way. In a nucleophilic substitution reaction, one of the reactant molecules (the nucleophile) will attack the other molecule (the electrophile) and form a new bond with it. The product of this type of reaction will typically be a molecule with one less bond than thereactants.

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Another way to predict the outcome of an organic reaction is to look at the types of atoms that are present in the reactant molecules. For example, if one reactant molecule contains a carbon atom and anotherreactant molecule contains an oxygen atom, it is likely that they will undergo a combustion reaction. This is because carbon and oxygen atoms tend to interact with each other in a predictable way. In a combustion reaction, oxygen reacts with carbon to form carbon dioxide and water. The products of this typeof reaction will typically be carbon dioxide and water vapor.

Once you have considered all of these factors, you should be able to predict which product will be formed in an organic reaction.

Methods

The most common method for organic synthesis isdehydration ofan alcohol using an acidsuch as sulfuric acidor phosphoric acidas the catalyst. The starting material for this reaction is usually an alcohol with a good leaving group, such as tert-butyl alcohol. The product of this reaction is an alkene.

In the second method, called theWacker process,copper-catalyzed oxygenation of an alkene in the presence of water produces a ketone. This reaction is useful for the synthesis of aliphatic ketones from alkenes.

The third method for organic synthesis is called hydroboration-oxidation. In this reaction, borane (BH3)is used to convert an alkene into a trialkyl borate, which can then be oxidized to produce an alcohol. This method is useful for the synthesis of primary and secondary alcohols from alkenes.

Results

1-Butanol
2-Butanol
2-Methyl-1-propanol
3-Methyl-1-butanol

Discussion

The expected major organic product for the reaction shown is 3-hexanol.

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Conclusion

In summary, the expected major organic product for the reaction shown is a light roast.

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