How to Predict the Organic Products for the Reaction Shown

This guide will teach you how to predict the organic products for the reaction shown. In order to do this, you will need to know the reactants, products, and reagents involved in the reaction.

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Introduction

In general, the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds are determined by the relative strength of four intermolecular forces:
-Ion-ion attractions (found in salts)
-Ion-dipole attractions
-Dipole-dipole attractions
-Dispersion forces

Theoretical Principles

There are several ways to predict the organic products for a given reaction. The first step is to determine the reaction type. This can be done by looking at the reactants and products and identifying the functional groups present. The next step is to identify the possible products for the given reaction type. For example, in a nucleophilic substitution reaction, the possible products are those that have the leaving group replaced with the nucleophile. Once the possible products have been identified, the most likely product can be determined by looking at the relative stability of the products.

The Law of Mass Action

The Law of Mass Action is a fundamental chemical reaction principle that governs many organic reactions. It states that the rate of a reaction is proportional to the concentration of the reactants. This law is used to predict the organic products for a given reaction.

In order for a reaction to occur, the reactants must collide with each other. The chance of two molecules colliding is directly proportional to the concentration of each reactant. The higher the concentration, the more collisions that will occur. The Law of Mass Action can be used to predict the direction a reaction will go based on the concentrations of the reactants.

If you know the starting concentrations of the reactants and their expected product, you can use the Law of Mass Action to predict how much product will be formed.

The Reaction Quotient

In order for a reaction to occur, the reactants must have adequate energy to overcome the activation energy, Ea. Thespeed of a reaction increases as the temperature is increased.

The distribution of kinetic energies for molecules at a given temperature is given by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. At any given moment, there are always a few molecules that possess enough kinetic energy to overcome the activation energy and
react. As the temperature is increased, more and more molecules will have enough energy to react.
The number of collisions per unit time that have energies equal to or greater than the activation energy is proportional to the rate of the reaction and is given by the expression:
-k = A * e(-Ea/RT)
where k is the rate constant, A is a constant that depends on collisions of high-energy molecules, e is the natural logarithm function, and R is the universal gas constant and T is absolute temperature.

The Equilibrium Constant

In chemical equilibrium, the reactant concentrations remain constant. The reaction can proceed in both the forward and reverse directions, but the rates of these two processes are equal so that overall there is no net change in concentration. This can be represented by the following equation:
$$\ce{aA + bB <=> cC + dD}$$
In this equation, the letters A, B, C, and D represent reactant or product species, and the coefficients a, b, c, and d represent their stoichiometric coefficients. The double arrows indicate that the reaction can proceed in both directions.

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The equilibrium constant for this reaction is represented by the following expression:
$$K = \frac{\ce{[C]^c[D]^d}}{\ce{[A]^a[B]^b}}$$
In this expression, square brackets denote molar concentrations. The superscripts on these concentrations indicate their stoichiometric coefficients in the balanced chemical equation. For example, if we start with 0.5 moles of A and 0.5 moles of B, then at equilibrium we would expect to find 0.25 moles of C and 0.25 moles of D because c and d are both 2. Similarly, if we start with 1 mole of A and 2 moles of B (a=1 , b=2), then at equilibrium we would expect to find 0.5 moles of C and 1 mole of D because c+d=3 .

Experimental Methods

In order to predict the organic products of the reaction, one must first know what the reactants are. The reactants are the starting materials that are used in the reaction. The products are the materials that are produced by the reaction. To predict the organic products, one must also know the organic reactants.

Determination of the Reaction Order

The first step in any kinetic study is the determination of the reaction order. The Reaction Order is defined as the sum of the powers to which the concentration of each reactant is raised in the rate law expression. For example, if a reactant were to have a first order coefficient, it would be denoted by a value of 1. If it were second order, it would be 2, and so on and so forth. The easiest way to determine the reaction order is to measure the rate of reaction as a function of concentrations of each reactant while holding all other variables constant. This can be accomplished in a number of ways, but one common way is to measure the absorbance of light by a product over time while varying [reactant].

Determination of the Reaction Quotient

In any chemical reaction, the reaction quotient (Q) can be used to predict the direction in which the reaction will shift in order to reach equilibrium. The reaction quotient is defined as the ratio of the concentrations of products to reactants raised to their respective stoichiometric coefficients. In other words, Q is equal to the concentration of products divided by the concentration of reactants. If Q is less than K, then the reaction will shift to the right in order to increase Q. This shift will result in an increase in the concentration of product and a decrease in reactant concentration. If Q is greater than K, then the reaction will shift to the left so that Q decreases. This shift results in a decrease in product concentration and an increase in reactant concentration.

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Determination of the Equilibrium Constant

Kc is defined as the equilibrium constant for a chemical reaction. It is a measure of the relative-ability of the reactants and products to reach equilibrium. The value of Kc is different for every reaction and can be either a positive or negative number. A value of Kc greater than 1 means that the products are favored at equilibrium, while a value of Kc less than 1 means that the reactants are favored.

There are several methods that can be used to determine the value of Kc for a reaction. The most common method is to use an experiment known as titration. In this method, a measured amount of reactant is added to a known amount of product. The mixture is then allowed to reach equilibrium, and the concentrations of the reactants and products are measured. From these measurements, the value of Kc can be calculated using the following formula:

Kc = (Product Concentration)^(number of moles of product) / (Reactant Concentration)^(number of moles of reactant)

Another method that can be used to determine Kc is by using the van ‘t Hoff factor. This factor is a measure of how many moles of product are formed from each mole of reactant during a chemical reaction. It is usually represented by the symbol “i”. For example, if one mole of reactant produces two moles of product, the van ‘t Hoff factor would be 2. The van ‘t Hoff factor can be used to calculate Kc using the following formula:

Kc = (Product Concentration)^(i) / (Reactant Concentration)^(i-1)

The van ‘t Hoff factor is not always easy to determine, so it is not always possible to use this method to calculate Kc. However, it can be useful in some cases.

Once the value of Kc has been determined, it can be used to predict the direction in which a chemical reaction will proceed at any given set of conditions (temperature, pressure, etc.). If the value of Kc is greater than 1, then the reaction will proceed towards products; if it is less than 1, then the reverse will happen and reactants will be favored. If Kc = 1, then there will be no net change in concentrations over time and equilibrium will have been reached.

Results and Discussion

Based on the trend shown in the graph, it can be predicted that the organic products for the reaction will be less than the inorganic products. This is because the organic products have a higher boiling point and thus, require more energy to break the bonds between the molecules. In addition, the organic products are less stable than the inorganic products.

Reaction Order

If the reaction rate is independent of concentration, then the order of the reaction must be zero. This can be shown mathematically by taking the logarithm of the rate law expression:
In a zeroth-order reaction, the rate is directly proportional to the concentration of a single reactant raised to the power of zero. The table below shows how the rate varies with concentration for a zeroth-order reaction:

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As you can see from the table, regardless of how large or small the concentration of reactant A is, the reaction rate will always be the same. This is because in a zeroth-order reaction, concentration has no effect on how fast the reaction occurs.

Reaction Quotient

Reaction quotient (Q) can be used to predict the direction in which a system will shift to reach equilibrium. Q is calculated using concentrations of reactants and products at a given point in time. If Q is less than K, the system will shift to the right, increasing the concentrations of products. If Q is greater than K, then the system will shift to the left, favoring the formation of reactants over products

In our example, we have a reaction between two reactants, A and B, to produce two products, C and D. We can calculate Q using the following equation:

Q = [C]*[D]/([A]*[B])

Where [ ] denotes concentration.

We can use this equation to predict whether our reaction will favor reactants or products under different conditions. For example, if we have a high concentration of reactants and a low concentration of products, Q will be low and the reaction will favor reactants over products.

Equilibrium Constant

In order to calculate the equilibrium constant, you will need to know the following information:
-The starting concentrations of all reactants and products
-The equilibrium concentrations of all reactants and products
-The reaction rate constant

With this information, you can then plug it into the equilibrium expression:
K = [Products]/[Reactants]

If you know the value of K, you can then predict the concentrations of reactants and products at any given point in time.

Conclusion

The nature of the organic products for the reaction shown can be estimated by looking at the starting materials and the reagents used. The starting material is an alkene, which is a compound with a carbon-carbon double bond. The reagents used are H2 and Pd(0).

When H2 is added to an alkene, it adds across the double bond to form a saturated compound (a compound without double bonds). The type of saturated compound that is formed depends on the particular alkene that is reacted. In this case, the alkene has one carbon atom on each side of the double bond (it is symmetrical). This means that the product will be a symmetrical saturated compound, such as ethane or propane.

Pd(0) can also be used to add H2 across a double bond. However, in this case, the product will be an unsaturated compound (a compound with double bonds). The type of unsaturated compound that is formed depends on the particular alkene that is reacted. In this case, the alkene has one carbon atom on each side of the double bond (it is symmetrical). This means that the product will be a symmetrical unsaturated compound, such as ethene or propene.

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