How to Draw the Organic Product for the Following Acid-Catalyzed Hydroly

How to Draw the Organic Product for the Following Acid-Catalyzed Hydroly

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Introduction

In organic chemistry, an acid-catalyzed hydrolysis is a type of reactivity in which an organic molecule is broken down by water in the presence of an acid. This reaction is important in many industrial processes, such as the production of biofuels, and is also a key step in the digestion of food in the human body.

The catalytic mechanism of this reaction is typically carried out by a Lewis acid, such as a metal ion or protonated amine. The Lewis acid activates the water molecule by forming a Coordinated Water adduct, which can then act as a nucleophile and attack the carbon-oxygen bond of the organic molecule.

In this tutorial, we will learn how to draw the organic product for the following acid-catalyzed hydrolysis:

The reactant is 2-methylpropane and the product is methanol.

What is the organic product for the following acid-catalyzed hydrolysis?

The organic product for the following acid-catalyzed hydrolysis is an alcohol. The reason for this is that the hydrolysis of an ester is an equilibrium process, and the formation of an alcohol is favored by the presence of water.

The Structure of the Organic Product

When an acid and water are present, the organic product will have the structure of a carboxylic acid.

The Mechanism of the Reaction

The mechanism of the reaction is not difficult to understand if we remember a few basic rules. First, acids catalyze the hydrolysis of esters by protonating the carbonyl oxygen atoms. This protonation makes the carbonyl group more electrophilic, which means that it is more likely to react with water.

  The Benefits of Organic Products

In this particular reaction, we can see that the first step is the Protonation of the Carbonyl Oxygen Atom by HCl. This makes the carbonyl group more electrophilic and thus more reactive towards water. In the second step, water attacks the carbonyl carbon atom and bonds to it, forming a hydroxyl group (-OH) and a carboxylate group (-OCO2H). Finally, in the third step, HCl removes a proton from one of the oxygen atoms in water, forming H2O and leaving behind an ionic chloride salt.

Conclusion

In summary, the organic product for the given acid-catalyzed hydrolysis can be drawn by:

1. First, identify the functional groups present in the starting material.

2. Second, determine the position of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis.

3. Third, predict the products of the hydrolysis based on the functional groups present in the starting material.

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