Drawing the Major Organic Product for the Reaction Shown

In this post we will be discussing how to draw the major organic product for the reaction shown below.

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Introduction

In organic chemistry, drawing the major organic product for the reaction shown is an important skill. In order to draw the major organic product, you will need to know about the reactivity of functional groups, as well as common reaction mechanisms. With this knowledge, you will be able to predict which reactant will be the major product in a given reaction.

Theoretical Background

In organic chemistry, there are many reactions that can produce the same organic product(s). As a result, it is important for students of organic chemistry to be able to predict which reaction will give the major organic product. For example, the reaction between ethane and chlorine can give either chloroethane or dichloroethane. Based on what you know about alkyl halides, which do you think is the major product?

To help you answer this question, let’s first review some key concepts. Alkyl halides are classified as primary, secondary, or tertiary based on the number of alkyl groups attached to the carbon atom that is bonded to the halide group.

-A primary alkyl halide has one alkyl group bonded to the carbon that is bonded to the halide.
-A secondary alkyl halide has two alkyl groups bonded to the carbon that is bonded to the halide.
-A tertiary alkyl halide has three alkyl groups bonded to the carbon that is bonded to the halide.

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In addition, we can further classify alkyl halides as vinyl or aryl based on whether the carbons that are bonded to the halide are part of a double bond (vinyl) or an aromatic ring (aryl).

Organic reactions often involve breaking bonds and forming new bonds. When we talk about breaking and forming bonds, we are referring to both sigma (σ) and pi (π) bonds. A σ bond is a bond between two atoms that involves overlapping orbitals, while a σ* bond is an antibonding orbital created by overlapping orbitals. A π bond is formed by head-on overlap of p orbitals, while a π* bond is an antibonding orbital created by head-on overlap of p orbitals.

It should be noted that in addition to contributing electrons to create new bonds, some electrons must also be available to break existing bonds. The electrons that are available for bond formation are called valence electrons, while those involved in breaking existing bonds are called reactant electrons. The reactant electrons come from both σ and π bonds, while valence electrons come from σ and π* orbitals..

Methods

The mechanism for the reaction shown starts with an SN2 reaction in which the nucleophile, CH3SH, attacks the methylcarbonium ion, CH3+, from the back side. The leaving group, I-, is ejected and the CH3S- ion is produced.

Materials

-graphite (lead) pencil
– drawing paper
-eraser
-ruler or straightedge

Procedure

1. Gather the necessary materials. You will need a pencil, pen, and paper.
2. Draw a line to represent the reactant molecules.
3. For each carbon atom in the reactant, draw bonds to the other atoms in the molecule. Make sure that each carbon atom has four bonds.
4. Determine which is the most electronegative atom in the molecule and mark it with an asterisk (*).
5. Draw arrows showing the flow of electrons from the electron-rich atoms (typically hydrogen) to theelectronegative atom.*
6. Draw the major organic product of the reaction, taking care to show all atoms and bonds clearly

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Results

The major organic product for the given reaction is shown below.

Discussion

When organic reactions are carried out, it is important to know what the major organic product will be. This can be determined by looking at the reactants and understanding the reaction mechanism. In this guide, we will walk you through how to draw the major organic product for the following reaction:

The reactants in this reaction are an alkene (compound A) and HBr (compound B). The first step in the reaction is that HBr attacks the alkene to form a carbocation intermediate (compound C). In the next step, the bromine attacks the carbocation to form a dibromide product (compound D). Finally, the dibromide product rearranges to form a stable tertiary carbocation (compound E), which then undergoes a proton transfer to form the final product (compound F).

Drawing the Major Organic Product for the Reaction Shown:

To draw the major organic product for this reaction, start by drawing compound A, an alkene. Then, add HBr (compound B) to form compound C, a carbocation intermediate. Next, add bromine (compound D) to form a dibromide product. Finally, rearrange compound E to form a tertiary carbocation, which then undergoes a proton transfer to give the final product (compound F).

Conclusion

In conclusion, we have drawn the major organic product for the reaction shown. We have also discussed the possible side reactions and how to avoid them.

References

http://www. organic-chemistry. org/ namedreactions/ drawing/

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