Draw the Major Organic Product for the Reaction Conditions Shown

When you’re asked to draw the major organic product for a given reaction, there are a few things you need to keep in mind. First, make sure you know what the major organic product is. Second, be sure to follow the reaction conditions shown.

With these guidelines in mind, let’s take a look at an example.

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Introduction

In organic chemistry, there are a variety of ways to classify reactions. One common way is by the type of reactant or reagent used. For example, we can have organic reactions, inorganic reactions, or biochemistry reactions. Another classification method is by the type of product formed. For example, we can have addition reactions, elimination reactions, substitution reactions, or rearrangement reactions.

One specific type of reaction is the electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. In this type of reaction, an electron-rich aromatic ring (such as benzene) is reacted with an electron-poor reagent (called an electrophile). This electrophile substitutes for one of the atoms in the ring, forming a new compound.

There are several different types of electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions, each with its own set of conditions and products. In this guide, we will discuss the two main types of these reactions: substituted aromatic compounds and unsubstituted aromatic compounds.

The Reaction

In the reaction, the major organic product is drawn in the box to the right. The reaction conditions are: heat, water, orange juice, and concentrated HCl.

The Reactants

Thea-noble gases are unreactive under standard conditions. They are, however, reactive when heated to high temperatures or when exposed to electrical discharge. The reactions of thea-noble gases with other elements result in the formation of compounds in which thea-noble gas atoms exhibit an oxidation state of +4.

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The Products

The products of the reaction are methane and water.

The Major Organic Product

The major organic product for the reaction conditions shown is methane. Methane is a gas at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. It is soluble in water and is a highly flammable gas.

The Structure

The structure of the major organic product for the reaction conditions shown is a pentane derivative.

The Mechanism

The mechanism for the formation of the major organic product for the reaction conditions shown is as follows:

1) A nucleophile (Nu-) attacks the carbon atom bearing the leaving group (LG). This carbon atom is known as the electrophile (E+).
2) The LG is displaced from the E+ by Nu-. This forms a new covalent bond between Nu- and E+.
3) The electrons in the new bond are redistributed, forming a double bond between C and Nu-. This creates a resonance-stabilized structure known as an electron-rich intermediate.
4) The intermediate is protonated by an acid (H+), forming a new covalent bond between H and Nu-. This creates a resonance-stabilized structure known as a carbocation.
5) The carbocation rearranges to form a more stable structure by moving one of its substituents onto the carbon atom bearing the LG. This process is known as 1,2-shift.
6) TheLG is displaced from the E+ by Nu-, forming a new covalent bond between Nu- and E+.

Conclusion

From the data collected, it can be concluded that the light roast had the highest concentration of caffeine out of all the roasts. The dark roast had the lowest concentration of caffeine. This information is important to know when choosing a coffee based on caffeine content.

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