How to Determine the Major Organic Product for the Reaction Scheme Shown

How to Determine the Major Organic Product for the Reaction Scheme Shown

Checkout this video:

Introduction

In organic chemistry, the major organic product is the main product that is formed in a chemical reaction. To determine the major organic product, you need to consider two things:
-the reactivity of the functional groups involved
-the stability of the products.

The most common type of reaction in organic chemistry is the nucleophilic substitution reaction, where a nucleophile (a compound with a lone pair of electrons) attacks an electrophile (a compound with a vacant orbital). There are two types of nucleophilic substitution reactions: SN1 and SN2. The difference between these two types of reactions lies in the order in which the reactants bond to each other.

In an SN1 reaction, the nucleophile bonds to the electrophile first, and then the leaving group leaves. This type of reaction is more likely to occur when the leaving group is not very electronegative (such as chloride ion, Cl-). The advantage of this type of reaction is that it can happen even if the reactants are not very soluble in each other.

In an SN2 reaction, both the nucleophile and leaving group bond to the electrophile at the same time. This type of reaction is more likely to occur when the leaving group is very electronegative (such as fluoride ion, F-). The advantage of this type of reaction is that it happens very quickly.

Now that we know how to determine which type of nucleophilic substitution reaction will occur, let’s take a look at how to predict which product will be formed. In each case, we will consider only one molecule of each reactant.

  Organic Curly Hair Products

If there are two possible products, we will predict which one will be formed by using statistical methods (looking at how often each product is formed in similar reactions). If there are more than two possible products, we will use thermodynamic methods (looking at which product is lower in energy).

Theoretical Yields

Theoretical yields can be determined for a given reaction by calculating the mole ratios of reactants and products. For example, if the mole ratio of A to B is 2:1 and the mole ratio of C to D is 1:2, then the theoretical yield of C would be double that of D. In general, the yield will be limited by the reactant with the lowest ratio. In this case, that would be B.

Percent Yield

In order to determine the major organic product for the reaction scheme shown, you will need to calculate the percent yield for each possible product. Theoretical yields can be calculated by assuming that the reaction goes to completion and that there is no loss of product during isolation or purification.

In order to calculate the percent yield, you will need to know the mass of reactants used, the mass of products isolated, and the theoretical yield for the reaction. The formula for percent yield is:

Percent Yield = (Actual Yield/Theoretical Yield) x 100%

For example, if you started with 100 g of reactant A and isolated 70 g of product B, your percent yield would be:

Percent Yield = (70 g/100 g) x 100% = 70%

Determining the Major Organic Product

In organic chemistry, there are a variety of ways to determine the major organic product for the reaction scheme shown. The most important thing to consider is the stability of the product. The product with the most stable configuration will be the major organic product. There are a few things to consider when determining stability:

  How to Draw the Organic Product of the Two-Step Synthesis

-total number of bonds
-number of σ (sigma) bonds
-number of π (pi) bonds
-linkage between atoms
-steric hindrance

Once you have considered all of these factors, you will be able to determine which product is the most stable and, therefore, the major organic product.

Conclusion

From the reaction scheme given, it is clear that the major organic product will be compound C.

Scroll to Top